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Downton Abbey: Episode 2x07
beware of dog
lika_mikala wrote in scriptline

<<< EPISODE 2x06EPISODE 2x08 >>>


[OPENING CREDITS]

--
[00:30, EXT. DOWNTON ABBEY, FRONT DOOR - MORNING]
[Edith watches an army hospital truck leave.]

1919

[Mrs Hughes joins Edith.]

LADY EDITH
That's the last of the equipment gone.

MRS HUGHES
The maids have put the drawing room back to normal.

[The dog follows Robert around the house.]

--
[01:05, INT. DRAWING ROOM - MORNING]

ROBERT, EARL OF GRANTHAM
I'm walking down to the village. I want to have a word with Travis.

CORA, COUNTESS OF GRANTHAM
You know that Richard will be here any moment.

ROBERT, EARL OF GRANTHAM
That's why I'm telling you. Give him my excuses, I'll see him at dinner.

CORA, COUNTESS OF GRANTHAM
Is there any news on the Bates situation?

ROBERT, EARL OF GRANTHAM
Not that I'm aware of.

CORA, COUNTESS OF GRANTHAM
So, you still want to keep him on?

ROBERT, EARL OF GRANTHAM
Cora, Bates's wife has committed suicide. It's very sad, of course, but not, when I last looked, a reason to sack him.

CORA, COUNTESS OF GRANTHAM
They've taken the rest of the beds.

ROBERT, EARL OF GRANTHAM
So, that’s the finish of it.

CORA, COUNTESS OF GRANTHAM
Not quite. We still have Matthew. And I wanted to ask you, isn’t it time he went home?

ROBERT, EARL OF GRANTHAM
I see. You want to throw him out.

CORA, COUNTESS OF GRANTHAM
Robert! I want him to learn to be as independent as he can, and I want Mary to get on with her life. What’s wrong with that?

ROBERT, EARL OF GRANTHAM
Is there something you’re not telling me?

CORA, COUNTESS OF GRANTHAM
What do you mean?

ROBERT, EARL OF GRANTHAM
About Mary and Matthew. Some element you haven’t told me?

CORA, COUNTESS OF GRANTHAM
Of course not! You’re being silly.

ROBERT, EARL OF GRANTHAM
If thinking that trying to protect Mary with a ring of steel is silly, then, yes, I am very silly.

[Robert leaves angrily.]

--
[02:08, INT. LIBRARY - MORNING]
[Carson carries tea into the library.]

LAVINIA
Seriously. They have special [?] now.

[Carson puts the tray down.]

MATTHEW
You shouldn't be doing that.

MR CARSON
Let us hope the end of the war brings the return of the footmen, Mr Crawley.

LAVINIA
Do you think they will return?

MR CARSON
I certainly hope so.

MATTHEW
I'm sure Sir Richard can buy you a dozen when you get to Hacksby.

--
[02:33, EXT. DOWNTON ABBEY, DRIVEWAY - DAY]
[Jane picks up some spilled apples on her knees. Robert approaches.]

ROBERT, EARL OF GRANTHAM
Let me.

JANE
Oh. No, my lord, I can manage it.

[Robert helps her pick up the apples.]

JANE
The handle broke.

ROBERT, EARL OF GRANTHAM
Aren't we feeding you?

JANE
They're from my mother's apple store. She always loads me up.

[They stand up.]

ROBERT, EARL OF GRANTHAM
How is your boy doing? Er, Freddy?

JANE
Yes, Freddy. He's doing very well.

ROBERT, EARL OF GRANTHAM
I wrote to the headmaster of Ripon Grammar. I said to look out for him.

JANE
Tha-- that's so kind, my lord.

ROBERT, EARL OF GRANTHAM
I hope it works. I don't really see why it should, but you never know. I suppose you miss your husband very much.

JANE
Of course. But I have Freddy. And when you think of what some families have gone through...

ROBERT, EARL OF GRANTHAM
I know. Almost thirty dead on this estate alone. And the Elkins down at Longway lost three out of four sons. Mrs Carter's only boy was killed a-- a month before the end of the war. Poor Wililam. And then there's Matthew.

[Robert mourns all of these losses in a pathetic tone and Jane's heart goes out to him.]

ROBERT, EARL OF GRANTHAM
Do you ever wonder what it was all for?

[They're distracted by an approaching motorcar.]

JANE
I better go in, my lord.

[Jane walks off toward the servants' entrance and Robert walks toward the front door. Sir Richard's car pulls up. Robert joins him as he steps out.]

SIR RICHARD CARLISLE
The train was late.

ROBERT, EARL OF GRANTHAM
Welcome to the new world.

SIR RICHARD CARLISLE
When a war is over, the first emotion is relief, the second, disappointment.

ROBERT, EARL OF GRANTHAM
How sad. But how true. Come in and have some tea.

--
[04:42, INT. SERVANTS' HALL - DAY]
[Mrs Patmore brings some food to the table.]

ANNA
Will you miss the extra staff, Mrs Patmore?

MRS PATMORE
Not really. When push comes to shove, I'd rather do it myself. Though God knows what I'm to feed them on. There's nothing out there to be had. Oh well. The Lord tempers the wind to the shorn lamb.

DAISY MASON
What about you, Thomas? How much longer will you stay?

THOMAS
Well, now the last of the invalids have gone, I suppose I'm finished. I'll report to Major Clarkson, but he won't be taking anyone on.

ANNA
I suppose the hospital will revert to the way it was before the war.

DAISY MASON
Where will you go?

THOMAS
What's it to you?

[Thomas leaves and O'Brien follows him.]

O'BRIEN
Where will you go?

THOMAS
I'll tell you where I'm going. Into business. It's all set up.

O'BRIEN
Do you mean black market business?

THOMAS
Don't look so surprised. I found a dealer, and as soon as I make the payment, I'll have the supplies.

O'BRIEN
Where will you keep them?

THOMAS
I've got a shed in the village, and I've got a [?] to deliver the stuff. I'll be well fixed as soon as word gets out. You heard her. There are shortages all around.

O'BRIEN
Isn't it dangerous?

THOMAS
I don't think so. I don't think the police are bothered about rationing now the war's over. It won't last forever. But by the time it's done, I should have enough to go into business properly.

O'BRIEN
So that's your future settled as a plutocrat. In the meantime, have you found somewhere to live?

THOMAS
Not yet, but there's no hurry. I'm sure they won't object if I stop here for a week or two.

O'BRIEN
I shouldn't bet on it.

[The dressing gong rings and the servants get up to prepare.]

--
[06:28, INT. LORD GRANTHAM'S DRESSING ROOM - EVENING]

MR BATES
I nearly put out the new, milord, but then Mr Carson said the Dowager was dining here.

ROBERT, EARL OF GRANTHAM
Quite right. Mustn't frighten the horses. By the way, Her Ladyship was asking if there's any more news about Mrs Bates.

MR BATES
I don't think so, milord. They'd like to know why she did it, but I don't suppose we ever shall.

ROBERT, EARL OF GRANTHAM
You think she'd leave a note.

MR BATES
Perhaps it was a spur of the moment decision.

ROBERT, EARL OF GRANTHAM
Well, it can't have been, can it? And wouldn't she have to get hold of the stuff?

[Bates seems surprised and disturbed.]

ROBERT, EARL OF GRANTHAM
Please forgive me, I was thinking aloud. We'll drop the subject.

--
[07:06, INT. UPSTAIRS CORRIDOR - EVENING]
[Anna walks past Carlisle's guest bedroom.]

SIR RICHARD CARLISLE
Anna?

[She stops and Carlisle steps out of his room.]

SIR RICHARD CARLISLE
It is Anna, isn't it?

ANNA
Yes, sir.

SIR RICHARD CARLISLE
I want to ask a favour of you.

ANNA
Of me, Sir Richard?

SIR RICHARD CARLISLE
You. I've been waiting for you. I wonder if you could step into my room for a moment.

[Anna hesitates, about to protest, but checks that no one is in the corridor and follows him in.]

--
[07:29, INT. CARLISLE’S GUEST BEDROOM - DAY]
[Carlisle closes the door.]

SIR RICHARD CARLISLE
You attend Lady Mary and her sisters, don't you? In addition to your other duties

ANNA
I do, sir, yes.

SIR RICHARD CARLISLE
You must be kept very busy. I hope it's worth your while. Because I would be very willing to increase your stipend.

ANNA
If this is about coming with Lady Mary when you marry, it's very good of you, sir, but you see, my fiancé Mr Bates works here and I don't think that I--

SIR RICHARD CARLISLE
No, it's-- it's not that. Although, it's a pity. Lady Mary's very fond of you.

ANNA
That's kind.

SIR RICHARD CARLISLE
You see, I'm anxious to make Lady Mary happy.

ANNA
Of course you are, sir.

SIR RICHARD CARLISLE
And to that end, I feel I need to know a great deal more about her than I do. Our customs are so strange in this country. A couple is hardly allowed a moment alone together before they walk down the aisle.

ANNA
I’m not sure I understand, sir.

SIR RICHARD CARLISLE
I’d like to know more about her interests. Where she goes, whom she sees, what she says to them.

ANNA
Excuse me, sir, do you mean you want me to give you a report of Lady Mary’s actions?

SIR RICHARD CARLISLE
It’ll be extra work, but I’m happy to pay.

ANNA
I’m sure. But I’m afraid I wouldn’t have the time. Thank you, sir.

SIR RICHARD CARLISLE
Well, it's your choice, of course.

[Anna turns to go.]

SIR RICHARD CARLISLE
I'd be grateful if you didn't mention this to Lady Mary. I wouldn't want her to think I was checking up on her.

[Anna gives him a disgusted look and leaves.]

[BREAK 1]

--
[09:22, INT. DRAWING ROOM - EVENING]

ROBERT, EARL OF GRANTHAM
I nearly came down in a dinner jacket tonight.

VIOLET, DOWAGER COUNTESS OF GRANTHAM
Really? Well, why not a dressing gown? Or, better still, pyjamas?

ROBERT, EARL OF GRANTHAM
That's why I didn't.

ISOBEL CRAWLEY
I like the new fashions. Shorter skirts, looser cuts. The old clothes were all very well if one spent the day on a chaise longue, but if one wants to get anything done, the new clothes are much better.

VIOLET, DOWAGER COUNTESS OF GRANTHAM
I'll stick to the chaise longue.

LADY SYBIL
Granny, you don't really want things to go back to the way they were, surely?

VIOLET, DOWAGER COUNTESS OF GRANTHAM
Of course I do. And as quickly as possible.

LADY SYBIL
What about you, Papa?

ROBERT, EARL OF GRANTHAM
Before the war, I believed my life had value. I suppose I should like to feel that again.

[Awkward silence.]

LADY MARY
Have you seen the boys’ haircuts the women are wearing in Paris?

MATTHEW
I hope you won’t try that.

[Mary looks over at him in surprise and Violet looks curiously between them.]

LADY MARY
I might.

LAVINIA
I’m not sure how feminine it is.

LADY MARY
I’m not sure how feminine I am.

SIR RICHARD CARLISLE
Very, I’m glad to say.

[Edith grins in amusement.]

CORA, COUNTESS OF GRANTHAM
Carson, I keep forgetting to tell Mrs Hughes we've had a letter from Major Bryant's mother. She and her husband are in Yorkshire on Friday and she wants to pay us a visit.

ROBERT, EARL OF GRANTHAM
Why?

CORA, COUNTESS OF GRANTHAM
The last time they saw him alive it was here. I can understand.

MR CARSON
Will they be staying, my lady?

CORA, COUNTESS OF GRANTHAM
No, but we'll give them luncheon. That way, they can talk about the Major with all of us who knew him.

[Sybil looks like she's trying to contain her irritation toward the insipid conversation.]

VIOLET, DOWAGER COUNTESS OF GRANTHAM
That lets me out, thank heaven.

--
[10:44, INT. DOWNTON GARAGE - EVENING]
[Branson hears heels clicking on the garage floor and glances up from the car engine. He does a double take as he sees Sybil in her evening gown. She tilts her head shyly, waiting for him to say something.]

BRANSON
You look very fine.

LADY SYBIL
Everything I own is from my season before the war. I’m trying to wear them out.

[Branson continues to check her out.]

LADY SYBIL
Where have you been all day?

BRANSON
Nowhere. I’ve just been busy.

LADY SYBIL
I envy you. I feel so flat after the rush and bustle of the last two years. They were sighing for the old days at dinner, but all I could do was think about how much more I want from life now than I did then.

BRANSON
Does this mean that you’ve made up your mind…at last?

LADY SYBIL
Not quite. But almost.

[Branson looks down, slightly disappointed. Sybil touches his face and he looks up, surprised, and stares at her longingly.]

--
[11:33, INT. MR CARSON’S OFFICE - EVENING]

MR CARSON
What do you mean, “How did she say it?”? "Mr and Mrs Bryant are coming for luncheon on Friday."

MRS HUGHES
How are things over at Hacksby?

MR CARSON
Pretty good. Building materials are in short supply, but Sir Richard knows how to get around that.

MRS HUGHES
Hmph, I bet he does.

MR CARSON
Oh, you should see some of the gadgets in the kitchens. And the bathrooms, oh, goodness me. They're like something out of a film with Theda Bara.

MRS HUGHES
I'm surprised you know who Theda Bara is.

MR CARSON
Oh, I get about, Mrs Hughes. I get about.

MRS HUGHES
But will you be happy there? That's what want to be sure of.

MR CARSON
If you're asking whether I'll regret leaving Downton, I will regret it every minute of every day. I thought I would die here and haunt it ever after.

MRS HUGHES
Well, then...

MR CARSON
You see, I think I can help her in those early years, when it's important to get it right. And if I can help her, then I must.

MRS HUGHES
I wish I could understand. To me, Lady Mary is an upity minx who's the author of her own misfortunes.

MR CARSON
You didn't know her when she was a child, Mrs Hughes. She was a guinea a [?] then. I remember once she came in here, can't have been more than four or five years old, she said, "Mr Carson, I've decided to run away and I wonder if I might take some of the silver to sell."

[They chuckle.]

MR CARSON
"Well," I said, "that could be awkward for His Lordship. I suppose I'll give you a sixpence to spend in the village instead." "Very well," said she, "but you must be sure to charge me interest."

[They chuckle.]

MRS HUGHES
And did you?

MR CARSON
She gave me a kiss in full payment.

MRS HUGHES
Then she had the better bargain.

MR CARSON
I wouldn't say that.

[Anna enters.]

ANNA
There you are, Mrs Hughes. They said you were in here. Might I have a word?

MRS HUGHES
Of course. Shall we go to my room?

ANNA
There's no reason Mr Carson shouldn't hear it. In fact, I think you probably should. You see, I've had a request from Sir Richard that you ought to know about.

--
[13:58, INT. MATTHEW’S GUEST BEDROOM - NIGHT]
[Bates helps Matthew into bed.]

MATTHEW
You’ve done this before. Bates, can I ask you something? If I started to feel a…tingling in my legs, what do you think that might mean?

MR BATES
Have you told Dr Clarkson?

MATTHEW
Yes. He says it’s an illusion. A memory of a tingling, or something. But, I mean, I do know my back is broken, I understand that I won’t recover, but…I do keep feeling it, or I think I do.

MR BATES
I should wait and see. If something is changing, it will make itself known. Now, will that be all?

MATTHEW
Yes, thank you. Bates...please don’t tell anyone. I couldn’t bear it if…Miss Swire or…Mother or…or anyone started to hope.

MR BATES
I won’t say a thing. Goodnight, sir.

--
[15:03, EXT. THE VILLAGE - MORNING]
[Mrs Hughes walks to the bus stop and nods to passersby.]

MRS HUGHES
Morning. Morning.

--
[15:13, INT. ETHEL'S HOUSE - DAY]

MRS HUGHES
I don't know why I'm doing this. I must be out of my mind.

ETHEL
Because you know it's my last chance.

MRS HUGHES
Well, that's true. They won't be back, not after this trip.

ETHEL
So, what should I do?

MRS HUGHES
Come to the house, but stay outside in the game larder. I'll leave some food there and a blanket, and then I'll try and find a moment alone with Mrs Bryant and tell her about little Charlie. And then, if she asks - only if she asks, mind you - I'll bring her out to see the child.

ETHEL
What about him?

MRS HUGHES
If either of them are in the least interested, it'll be the mother.

ETHEL
Do you think she'll help me?

MRS HUGHES
She might.

ETHEL
Suppose she won't see him?

MRS HUGHES
Then you're no worse off than you are already. Look, I shouldn't be doing it. So, if you're not keen, then, for heaven's sake, let's forget all about it.

ETHEL
No. I'll be there, I promise.

--
[16:08, INT. LIBRARY - DAY]

LADY SYBIL
Doesn't it feel odd to have the rooms back?

LADY EDITH
And only asked to sit in them. I suppose we'll get used to it.

LADY SYBIL
I don't want to get used to it.

LADY EDITH
What do you mean?

LADY SYBIL
I know what it is to work now. To have a full day, to be tired in a good way. I don't want to start dress fittings and or paying calls or standing behind the guns.

LADY EDITH
But how does one escape all that?

LADY SYBIL
I think I've found a way to escape.

LADY EDITH
Nothing too drastic, I hope.

LADY SYBIL
It is drastic. There's no going back once I've done it, but that's what I want. No going back.

LADY EDITH
I don't want to go back either.

LADY SYBIL
Then don't. You're far nicer than you were before the war, you know.

--
[16:54, EXT/INT. THOMAS'S STORAGE SHED - DAY]

O'BRIEN
Where did you get it all?

THOMAS
I told you, this bloke from Leeds.

O'BRIEN
Where did he get it?

THOMAS
Some's army surplus, some's from America and Ireland, everywhere. He's got contacts all over, that's what I'm paying him for.

O'BRIEN
How much have you paid him?

THOMAS
A lot. But I'm not worried. I'm taking nothing perishable. This lot'll last for months. I'll be sold out long before any of it's gone off.

O'BRIEN
Starting with Mrs Patmore.

--
[17:37, INT. PARLOUR - DAY]

LADY MARY
But Carson, if you're abandoning me, I think I deserve to know the reason why.

MR CARSON
I do not believe that Sir Richard and I would work well together.

LADY MARY
But there must be more to it than that. You knew what Sir Richard was like. We were to educate him together, you and I. Wasn't that the plan?

MR CARSON
Sir Richard offered Anna a sum of money to report your activities to him. Whom you saw, what you said...

LADY MARY
He wanted her to spy on me.

MR CARSON
Naturally, he used a different word.

LADY MARY
Naturally. And she refused?

MR CARSON
She refused, and she reported the offer to Mrs Hughes and me.

LADY MARY
Well, I wish she'd come to me first. So, you mean you'd be uncomfortable working for a spymaster? How disappointing of you. And I always thought you were fond of me.

[Carson is shocked. Carlisle enters from outside.]

SIR RICHARD CARLISLE
Ah, there you are. I had a quick walk before dinner.

LADY MARY
We ought to get changed first.

MR CARSON
Will that be all, my lady? Yes, Carson. Thank you. I think that will be all. Carson has decided not to come with us to Hacksby.

SIR RICHARD CARLISLE
Ah, I'm sorry. Is there anything I can say to change your mind?

MR CARSON
I'm afraid not, sir.

[Carson leaves.]

SIR RICHARD CARLISLE
What a shame.

LADY MARY
Not really. Butlers will be two a penny now they're all back from the war.

[Mr Carson hears that just before he closes the door.]

--
[19:13, INT. SERVE ROOM - EVENING]
[Robert turns the corner and is surprised to find Jane.]

ROBERT, EARL OF GRANTHAM
I gather Carson was looking for me.

JANE
Erm, sh--shall I go and find him, milord?

ROBERT, EARL OF GRANTHAM
It's all right. Tell him I'll be in the dressing room. Has he done the red wine yet?

JANE
Er, it's over here, milord.

ROBERT, EARL OF GRANTHAM
Ah. I'm pleased.

[Robert walks into the cupboard to look at the wine.]

ROBERT, EARL OF GRANTHAM
It's a new one on me. I had some at a dinner in London and ordered it. Carson thought we might try it tonight.

[Jane nods.]

ROBERT, EARL OF GRANTHAM
Well, I better go up.

JANE
You made me sad yesterday, wondering what the war was for.

ROBERT, EARL OF GRANTHAM
Oh, don't listen to me. I'm a foolish man who's lost his way and don't quite know how to find it again.

[Robert thinks for a moment, looking down at Jane, who is standing just within kissing distance. He leans forward and grabs her suddenly and kisses her. She makes slightly desperate noises as he kisses her, not knowing exactly what to do. He lets her go.]

ROBERT, EARL OF GRANTHAM
I'm terribly sorry. Please try to forgive me.

[Robert starts to walk off.]

JANE
I do forgive you.

[He pauses for a moment, and then continues walking. Jane rushes down to the servants' corridor and meets Mr Carson.]

JANE
Oh, Mr Carson, er, His Lordship said you were looking for him.

MR CARSON
And?

JANE
And, er...w-- I was to say that you'd find him in the dressing room.

MR CARSON
What's the matter with you?

JANE
Nothing.

[Jane rushes off and slips by Anna in the corridor.]

[BREAK 2]

--
[20:49, INT. LORD GRANTHAM'S DRESSING ROOM - EVENING]

MR CARSON
I wrestled with it, my lord, I don't mind admitting. And I wanted to be there to help Lady Mary, and--

ROBERT, EARL OF GRANTHAM
And protect her from Sir Richard.

MR CARSON
Well, I...wouldn't quite have put it like that, but...yes, I suppose. Only--

ROBERT, EARL OF GRANTHAM
Only you felt you couldn't work for a man who would offer a bribe.

MR CARSON
That is correct, my lord.

ROBERT, EARL OF GRANTHAM
Are you quite sure you won't regret it? I know how fond you are of Lady Mary.

MR CARSON
But I couldn't work for a man that I don't respect, and I certainly couldn't have left Downton for him.

ROBERT, EARL OF GRANTHAM
I shall take that as a compliment, for myself and for my house.

--
[21:29, INT. LADY MARY'S BEDROOM - EVENING]

LADY MARY
I still don't see why you didn't tell me first.

ANNA
I'm sorry milady, but I didn't want to add to your troubles.

LADY MARY
Well, you have done, whether you wanted to or not.

[Anna is upset by Mary's reprimand.]

--
[21:40, INT. LIBRARY - EVENING]
[Lavinia wheels Matthew into the library.]

MATTHEW
Nobody's down yet.

LAVINIA
They won't be long. Oh, look. They’ve cleared the tea, but forgotten to take that tray.

MATTHEW
Ring the bell.

LAVINIA
I’ll do it. They’ll be busy getting dinner ready.

MATTHEW
It’s too heavy for you.

LAVINIA
No, it’s not.

[Lavinia trips over a footstool.]

MATTHEW
Look out!

[Matthew stands up, trying to catch Lavinia, but she drops the tray and falls against the mantel.]

LAVINIA
Heavens, that was a near thing.

[Matthew takes her arm and they both realize he’s standing.]

LAVINIA
My God.

--
[Robert and Lavinia rush down the corridor, collecting the family.]

ROBERT, EARL OF GRANTHAM
Mary! Girls! Cora, come at once.

CORA, COUNTESS OF GRANTHAM
Robert, wait.

ROBERT, EARL OF GRANTHAM
Everyone come at once!

LADY MARY
What is it? What’s happened?

ROBERT, EARL OF GRANTHAM
Come and see this!

[They rush into the library.]

ROBERT, EARL OF GRANTHAM
Is it true? Is it true what Lavinia says?

[Lavinia goes to Matthew and he takes her hand to help himself stand up. The family is stunned with joy.]

LADY MARY
I can’t believe it!

CORA, COUNTESS OF GRANTHAM
It’s so wonderful!

LADY SYBIL
It is, but don’t tire yourself out. Sit down now and we’ll send for Dr Clarkson.

ROBERT, EARL OF GRANTHAM
She’s right. Edith, go with Branson. Ge--get Clarkson, but fetch Mama and Cousin Isobel as well. I don’t care what they’re doing. Tell them to come now. My dear chap, I cannot begin to tell you what this means to me.

MATTHEW
Well, it’s pretty good news for me, too.

[Robert laughs in relief.]

--
[22:55, INT. LIBRARY - EVENING]

DR CLARKSON
There is only one possible explanation. It starts with my own mistake. Every indication told me that the spine was transected, which would have been incurable.

ROBERT, EARL OF GRANTHAM
But when Sir John Coats came to see Matthew, he agreed with you.

DR CLARKSON
Well, he didn’t, not entirely. He thought that it could conceivably be a case of spinal shock. That is, erm, intense bruising, which was sufficiently severe to impede the leg mechanism.

LADY MARY
But which would heal.

LAVINIA
Why didn’t you tell us?

DR CLARKSON
Because I didn’t agree with him, and I didn’t want to raise Captain Crawley’s hopes to no purpose.

MATTHEW
I understand. And I don’t blame you.

DR CLARKSON
You must take it slowly. Rome wasn’t built in a day.

MATTHEW
I know.

DR CLARKSON
And I’m afraid you will carry a bruise on your spine for the rest of your life.

MATTHEW
But I will have a life.

DR CLARKSON
Yes. I think we can say that you will have a normal life, and it won’t be long in coming.

ISOBEL CRAWLEY
My darling boy. My darling boy.

[Isobel gets up to kiss him.]

MR CARSON
Excuse me, my lord, but Mrs Hughes was wondering what she should do about dinner.

ROBERT, EARL OF GRANTHAM
Er, you'll all stay for dinner, won't you?

DR CLARKSON
I'm afraid I'm not dressed.

ROBERT, EARL OF GRANTHAM
Oh, nevermind that. Who cares about that? What about you, Mama?

VIOLET, DOWAGER COUNTESS OF GRANTHAM
Oh, certainly. All this unbridled joy has given me quite an appetite.

--
[24:22, INT. SERVANTS' CORRIDOR - EVENING]

ANNA
There you are. I wondered what had happened to you. It's wonderful news, isn't it?

MR BATES
Wonderful. Are you busy?

ANNA
I'm just going up to help in the dining room. Why?

MR BATES
It'll keep.

ANNA
No, tell me. I've got time.

MR BATES
It's just, something His Lordship said recently I can't get out of my mind. How Vera must have...bought the poison and taken it home with her.

ANNA
Yes, I suppose she must, and it's...it's just such a terrible thing to think of.

MR BATES
But she didn't. I did.

ANNA
What?

MR BATES
Months ago, before I left, Vera said we needed rat poison, and I bought it. It was arsenic, and I've been thinking that's what she must've taken.

ANNA
Have you told the police?

MR BATES
No.

ANNA
Tell them. If you don't, when they find out, it'll look bad.

MR BATES
But wouldn't I be asking for trouble?

ANNA
You're asking for trouble if you stay silent.

MR CARSON
Anna, we're starting.

ANNA
Sorry, Mr Carson.

[Anna follows Carson upstairs.]

--
[25:15, INT. DINING ROOM - EVENING]

VIOLET, DOWAGER COUNTESS OF GRANTHAM
Tell me, how are things progressing at Hacksby?

SIR RICHARD CARLISLE
Quite well. I’ve put in a condition so the builders are fined for every day they go over.

VIOLET, DOWAGER COUNTESS OF GRANTHAM
Does that make for a happy atmosphere?

SIR RICHARD CARLISLE
I want it done. They can be happy in their own time.

VIOLET, DOWAGER COUNTESS OF GRANTHAM
Why the rush?

SIR RICHARD CARLISLE
I like everything I own to be finished and ready to sell.

VIOLET, DOWAGER COUNTESS OF GRANTHAM
You’re not thinking of selling Hacksby, surely?

SIR RICHARD CARLISLE
Depends. We’ll have to see if it suits us to be so close to Downton.

MATTHEW
I—I want to tell you all something. As you know, during this - well, I think I can say – horrible time, Lavinia has proved to be the most marvellous person.

ROBERT, EARL OF GRANTHAM
Here, here.

CORA, COUNTESS OF GRANTHAM
Indeed.

MATTHEW
I never thought we would marry, for all sorts of reasons, but she wouldn’t accept that. And so, now I’m very pleased to say that she’s been proved right.

[Sybil looks down, considering his words. Matthew and Lavinia hold hands at the table.]

MATTHEW
Lavinia and I will get married.

ROBERT, EARL OF GRANTHAM
Oh, my dear fellow.

ISOBEL CRAWLEY
Isn’t it wonderful?

[Cora looks at Mary, and Mary puts on a smile that she clearly doesn't feel.]

MATTHEW
Just as soon as I’m well enough to walk down the aisle. Dr Clarkson can help us with when.

DR CLARKSON
Not long now.

MATTHEW
And she feels we ought to marry here, at Downton, to bury forever the memories of what, I hope, has been the darkest period of my life.

ROBERT, EARL OF GRANTHAM
Of course.

LAVINIA
Are you sure? I know it should be at my home in London, but we’ve been through so much here.

ROBERT, EARL OF GRANTHAM
We’d be delighted.

VIOLET, DOWAGER COUNTESS OF GRANTHAM
Yes, bravo. Excellent news. Mary, isn’t that excellent news?

LADY MARY
Just excellent.

[Violet studies Mary's reaction. Sybil stares at nothing for a moment, thinking.]

--
[26:55, INT. DOWNTON GARAGE - NIGHT]
[Branson is reading the newspaper when he hears Sybil’s heels and looks up to see her entering.]

BRANSON
You’re very late. Won’t they worry?

LADY SYBIL
They’re all so excited, they won’t care where I am.

BRANSON
I’m pleased. I like Mr Matthew.

LADY SYBIL
He announced at dinner that he wants to get married at Downton. Somehow it made me feel more than ever that the war is really over and it’s time to move forward.

BRANSON
Do you mean you’ve made your decision?

LADY SYBIL
Yes. And my answer is...

[Branson braces himself.]

LADY SYBIL
That I’m ready to travel...and you are my ticket.

[Sybil smiles.]

LADY SYBIL
To get away from this house, away from this life--

BRANSON
Me?

LADY SYBIL
No, Uncle Tom Cobley.

[Sybil giggles and Branson stops holding his breath.]

BRANSON
I’m sorry. But I’ve waited so long for those words, I can’t believe I’m hearing them. You won’t mind burning your bridges?

LADY SYBIL
Mind? Fetch me the matches!

[Branson smiles with a sigh of relief and leans forward to kiss her. She holds back.]

LADY SYBIL
Yes, you can kiss me, but that is all until everything is settled.

BRANSON
For now, God knows, it’s enough that I can kiss you.

[Sybil smiles at his reply and they kiss.]

--
[28:19, INT. LADY GRANTHAM’S BEDROOM - NIGHT]

ROBERT, EARL OF GRANTHAM
What a day. I can’t stop smiling.

CORA, COUNTESS OF GRANTHAM
No. But another time, please ask me before you agree to host a wedding.

ROBERT, EARL OF GRANTHAM
What?

CORA, COUNTESS OF GRANTHAM
I’m fond of Matthew, of course, but you do realise this means Mary’s marriage will be delayed.

ROBERT, EARL OF GRANTHAM
I can’t help that.

CORA, COUNTESS OF GRANTHAM
Mary’s our first priority, Robert. And just because Matthew’s been lame...

ROBERT, EARL OF GRANTHAM
Matthew’s been lame? Can you hear the words coming out of your mouth? Can you hear how stupid and selfish they are? Because I can.

[BREAK 3]

--
[29:00, INT. KITCHENS - DAY]

MRS PATMORE
Don't bother me with it now. I've enough trying to make a luncheon that looks worth eating.

THOMAS
Well, that's what I'm saying. Everything's in short supply now.

MRS PATMORE
Short supply? No supply, more like. Talk about making a silk purse out of a sow's ear. I wish we had a sow's ear. It'd be better than this brisket.

O'BRIEN
That's just it. Thomas has come by some groceries and such and he's prepared to let them go for the right price.

MRS PATMORE
Oh, he's prepared to let them go, is he? And how did he come by them? That's what I'd like to know.

THOMAS
Well, they're not stolen, in case you're worried.

MRS PATMORE
Oh, I'm not worried. You're the one who should be worried. Tell you what, I'm making a wedding cake now for Mr Crawley. I'll finish it early and feed it with brandy. So, if I give you a list of ingredients, can you get them?

THOMAS
I can.

MRS PATMORE
And then we'll see. Now, will you leave me and let me get on with this travesty?

--
[29:58, EXT. DOWNTON ABBEY, FRONT DOOR - DAY]
[The Bryants arrive in a motorcar and Mrs Hughes steps up next to Carson to greet them.]

MR CARSON
Why are you here?

[Mrs Hughes doesn't reply.]

ROBERT, EARL OF GRANTHAM
Mr Bryant, Mrs Bryant, welcome.

MRS BRYANT
We're so pleased to be here. This is so kind of you, Lady Grantham.

MR BRYANT
It is kind, but we ought to make it clear we can't stay long. I wasn't sure we had time to come at all.

CORA, COUNTESS OF GRANTHAM
Luncheon's quite ready.

MR BRYANT
We must eat and run, I'm afraid. We have to be at Marypole by six.

ROBERT, EARL OF GRANTHAM
We're all so terribly sorry about the reason you're here.

MR BRYANT
If we could see Charles's rooms--

[Mrs Hughes steps forward quickly.]

MRS HUGHES
Shall I take Mrs Bryant up?

CORA, COUNTESS OF GRANTHAM
No, I'll do it.

ROBERT, EARL OF GRANTHAM
We'll all do it. My cousin, Mrs Crawley, who looked after Major Bryant and my daughters who nursed will join us for luncheon.

MRS BRYANT
How thoughtful.

MR BRYANT
But we can't be long. I've told our chauffeur to stay in the car.

MRS HUGHES
Will I take him something to eat?

MR BRYANT
Leave him be. He's quite happy.

ROBERT, EARL OF GRANTHAM
Now, please, come and see where Major Bryant lived while he was with us.

[They enter the house and Mrs Hughes is left standing there.]

--
[31:01, INT. GAME LARDER - DAY]

MRS HUGHES
I'm afraid it's not going to work.

ETHEL
Why?

MRS HUGHES
They're in the dining room now and they're getting straight into the car when they're finished. I tried to speak to her on her own, but there was never the right moment. (to the little boy) Your grandad is a bit of a bully.

ETHEL
But I must see them. I've come all this way.

MRS HUGHES
Of course it's a disappointment.

ETHEL
You said yourself there wouldn't be another chance.

MRS HUGHES
We can't know that. Maybe you should write to them after all. You've nothing to lose.

ETHEL
No. No, they have to see him. They must see Charlie.

MRS HUGHES
Well, maybe they will. Sometime in the future. I hope so. You'd better go now.

[Ethel looks down at Charlie and then walks out with him.]

--
[31:46, INT. KITCHENS - DAY]

DAISY MASON
This wedding cake, can I make it?

MRS PATMORE
You wouldn't know how to start.

DAISY MASON
But you can tell me. And if I make it early, then you can make another if it's no good.

MRS PATMORE
Hmm. If I say yes, will you do as you're told?

[Daisy smiles.]

MRS HUGHES
Daisy, there's a wretched chauffeur at the front who's not allowed to get out of the car.So, can you make him a sandwich and take him up a bottle of [?]--

[Mrs Hughes sees Ethel rush down the servants' corridor and her jaw drops.]

DAISY MASON
We've some ham.

MRS HUGHES
Oh, my God.

[Mrs Hughes goes after Ethel.]

DAISY MASON
Who was that?

MRS PATMORE
Wasn't that Ethel? Di-- did you see what she was carrying?

DAISY MASON
No.

MRS PATMORE
Then just...let's leave it alone.

--
[32:22, INT. DINING ROOM - DAY]

MRS BRYANT
I'm afraid Downton will be a place of pilgrimage for a while.

CORA, COUNTESS OF GRANTHAM
We're glad to be, if we can help to bring some peace of mind.

MR BRYANT
There's no point in wallowing in it. What good does it do?

ETHEL
Leave me alone!

MRS HUGHES
Ethel!

[Ethel rushes into the room with Charlie, Mrs Hughes and Anna in pursuit. The luncheon party is shocked.]

ANNA
I tried to stop her--

ROBERT, EARL OF GRANTHAM
What on earth?

CORA, COUNTESS OF GRANTHAM
Ethel-- (to Robert) I know what this is. Mrs Hughes, I don't think it's quite the right--

ETHEL
I'm stopping...until I've had my say.

[Ethel looks at Mrs Bryant.]

ETHEL
This is Charlie, your grandson. He's almost a year old.

[Mr Bryant stands up and throws his napkin on the table.]

MR BRYANT
What proof have you?

ETHEL
What?

MR BRYANT
I say, what proof have you? If my son was the father of this boy, where's your proof? Any letters? Any signed statement?

ETHEL
Why would there be any letters? We were in the same house.

MRS HUGHES
I think she's telling the truth.

MR BRYANT
I'm not interested in "think." I want proof that my son acknowledged paternity of this boy. If what you say is true, then he would've known of the boy's existence for months before he...before he was killed.

ETHEL
Yes, he knew.

MR BRYANT
So, what did he do about it?

ETHEL (close to tears)
Nothing. He did nothing.

MR BRYANT
Thank you. That's the proof I was looking for. If Charles was the father, he would never have shirked his responsibilities. Never.

ETHEL
Well, he did!

MR BRYANT
I won't listen to any more slander!

[Mrs Bryant is clearly upset, and not in agreement with her husband.]

MR BRYANT
Now, will you please go and take that boy with you, whoever he is! You're upsetting Mrs Bryant!

[Cora stares at Mr Bryant, appalled at his behaviour.]

MRS BRYANT
Well, I would like--

MR BRYANT
I said you are upsetting Mrs Bryant!

[Ethel cries.]

MR BRYANT
Lord Grantham, are you going to stand by while this woman holds us to ransom?

[Robert gives Mr Bryant an irritated look, but stands up.]

ROBERT, EARL OF GRANTHAM
This isn't doing much good.

MRS HUGHES
Ethel, you better come with me. Come on.

[Anna and Mrs Hughes escort Ethel out with Charlie crying in her arms. Robert and Mr Bryant take their seats.]

MR BRYANT
She thinks we're a soft touch. They hear of a dead officer with some money behind them and suddenly there's a baby on every corner.

ISOBEL CRAWLEY
But if she's telling the truth--

MR BRYANT
If Charles had fathered that boy, he would've told us. No, I'd say she's done her homework and discovered he was an only child. She thinks we'd be ripe for the plucking.

[The luncheon continues and Mrs Bryant turns to Isobel.]

MRS BRYANT
You knew her. Was she one of the nurses when he was here?

CORA, COUNTESS OF GRANTHAM
She was a housemaid.

SIR RICHARD CARLISLE
Were you aware?

LADY MARY
No.

ISOBEL CRAWLEY
No one told me Major Bryant was your only son.

MRS BRYANT
That's right. Just Charles.

ISOBEL CRAWLEY
Matthew is my only son, and he nearly died. I think I know a little of what you're going through.

MRS BRYANT
He seems such a nice young man--

MR BRYANT
Well, I think that's cast rather a shadow over the proceding, so I don't see any point in prolonging it.

[Mr Bryant gets up and exits, Cora follows him, and everyone else rises, too.]

MR BRYANT
Daphne, come on, we're leaving.

MRS BRYANT (to Isobel)
He's afraid of his own grief. That's why he behaves as he does. He's terrified of his own grief.

[Everyone stands there as Mrs Bryant exits with Robert.]

--
[35:23, INT. KITCHENS - DAY]

ETHEL
If that's what he's like, I don't want his help. I don't want it.

O'BRIEN
I doubt you'll have the option. You're a dark horse. How did you keep it a secret all this time?

ANNA
Maybe when he's thought about it, he'll feel differently. You never know.

[Carson enters.]

MR CARSON
Anna, will you kindly go upstairs and help in the dining room? Ethel, please take the child and leave.

[Ethel takes Charlie from Anna's arms.]

MR CARSON
How did you get here?

ETHEL
I caught the bus and walked up from the village.

MR CARSON
Then can you reverse the process as quickly as possible.

MR BATES
She's very badly shaken, Mr Carson. She's lost everything.

MR CARSON
Are you all right for the fare?

ETHEL
Yes, thank you.

--
[36:01, EXT. DOWNTON ABBEY, FRONT DOOR - DAY]
[Robert sees off the Bryants.]

--
[36:05, INT. LIBRARY - DAY]

LADY MARY
He's their only grandchild. There can never be another.

SIR RICHARD CARLISLE
Even if Ethel is telling the truth--

CORA, COUNTESS OF GRANTHAM
I believe she is.

SIR RICHARD CARLISLE
Even so, there’s no legal reality to it. The child is her bastard and has no claim on them.

[The ladies react to that.]

ROBERT, EARL OF GRANTHAM
Steady on, sir. The ladies have had enough shocks for one day.

SIR RICHARD CARLISLE
I just don’t see the point in pretending something can be done when it can’t.

MATTHEW
What about you, mother? Can’t one of your refugee charities help?

ISOBEL CRAWLEY
But she’s not a refugee, and we have more claims on our funding than we can possibly meet.

LADY MARY
The truth is, Ethel’s made her choice and now she’s stuck with it.

LAVINIA
That seems a little hard.

LADY MARY
Does it? Aren’t all of us stuck with the choices we make?

[Mary calmly drinks her tea while the others blanch at her coldness.]

--
[36:47, INT. KITCHENS, STORAGE - DAY]

MRS PATMORE
Candied pear, well, well. I never thought you'd find that.

THOMAS
I hope you're pleased, Mrs Patmore.

DAISY MASON
Course she is, aren't you? There's stuff here we haven't seen since before the war. I can't wait to get started.

MRS PATMORE
I won't ask where you got it from, because I don't want to know.

THOMAS
I keep saying there's nothing wrong, so what I'd like to know is--

O'BRIEN
When will he get paid?

MRS PATMORE
When I'm satisfied.

O'BRIEN
And when will that be, oh Mighty One?

MRS PATMORE
When Daisy's baked the cake and I'm pleased with it. He understands. He knows this is just the sprat to catch the mackerel.

--
[37:24, INT. MATTHEW’S GUEST BEDROOM - EVENING]
[Mr Bates helps Matthew into his wheelchair.]

MATTHEW
I really ought to walk to the library.

MR BATES
No need to rush it, sir. You’re getting better every day.

[A knock at the door. Mr Bates opens it]

VIOLET, DOWAGER COUNTESS OF GRANTHAM
Oh, Cousin Matthew, may I come in?

MATTHEW
Please.

[Matthew tries to get up in her presence.]

VIOLET, DOWAGER COUNTESS OF GRANTHAM
No, no, no. No, stay where you are. (to Bates as he exits and closes the door) Thank you.

[Matthew sits back down.]

VIOLET, DOWAGER COUNTESS OF GRANTHAM
No doubt you will regard this as rather unorthodox, my pushing into a man’s bedroom uninvited.

MATTHEW
Well, erm—

VIOLET, DOWAGER COUNTESS OF GRANTHAM
It’s just I don’t want us to be disturbed.

[She sits down.]

VIOLET, DOWAGER COUNTESS OF GRANTHAM
I’m sure you know how pleased I am that you will recover after all.

MATTHEW
Thank you.

VIOLET, DOWAGER COUNTESS OF GRANTHAM
Just as I am delighted that you can once more look forward to a...to a happy married life.

MATTHEW
I—I’m very lucky.

VIOLET, DOWAGER COUNTESS OF GRANTHAM
Now, this may come as a surprise, but I feel I must say it all the same.

MATTHEW
Please do.

VIOLET, DOWAGER COUNTESS OF GRANTHAM
Mary is still in love with you.

MATTHEW
What?

VIOLET, DOWAGER COUNTESS OF GRANTHAM
I was watching her the other night when you spoke of your wedding. She looked like...Juliet on awakening in the tomb.

MATTHEW
Mary and I have always—

VIOLET, DOWAGER COUNTESS OF GRANTHAM
Of course, I suspected long ago that the flame hadn’t quite gone out. But then there was no chance of your recovery, and it seemed best to let her try for happiness where she could.

MATTHEW
I—I quite agree, and--and Sir Richard is--

VIOLET, DOWAGER COUNTESS OF GRANTHAM
No, le—let’s not muddy the pool by discussing Sir Richard. The point is, you loved her once, you sure you can’t love her again?

MATTHEW
Cousin Violet, I...please don’t think I mind your...speaking to me in this way. I quite admire it, but...consider this: Lavinia came back against my orders, determined to look after me for the rest of my life, which meant that she would wash me and f--feed me and...do things that only the most dedicated nurse would undertake, and all with no hope of children or any improvement.

VIOLET, DOWAGER COUNTESS OF GRANTHAM
Yes. Yes, it’s all very admirable, and I give her full credit.

MATTHEW
Giving her that credit, do you think it would be right for me to throw her over because I can walk? To dismiss her because I no longer have need of her services?

VIOLET, DOWAGER COUNTESS OF GRANTHAM
Spoken like a man of honour. And we will not fall out over this.

MATTHEW
But you don’t agree.

VIOLET, DOWAGER COUNTESS OF GRANTHAM
I would just say one thing. Marriage is a long business. There’s no getting out of it for our kind of people. I mean, you may live forty...fifty years with one of these two women. Just make sure you have selected the right one.

--
[40:18, INT. DRAWING ROOM - EVENING]

LADY EDITH
Will it be April or May?

VIOLET, DOWAGER COUNTESS OF GRANTHAM
I should steer clear of May. Marry in May, rue the day.

LAVINIA
I think it’s April. Matthew should be walking normally by then.

LADY EDITH
Spring weddings are the prettiest of all.

[Across the room.]

SIR RICHARD CARLISLE
All this talk of weddings is making me impatient.

LADY MARY
I don’t think we can go into competition with Matthew and Lavinia, do you?

SIR RICHARD CARLISLE
After them, in the summer, let’s settle it before I return to London. You must be looking forward to travelling again. I know I am.

LADY MARY
Very well, the end of July. Then we can be out of England for August.

SIR RICHARD CARLISLE
You don’t sound very excited.

LADY MARY
To quote you, “That’s not who we are.” And there’s something I’ve been meaning to ask you.

[Matthew wheels himself into the room.]

LADY EDITH
Hail to the hero.

ROBERT, EARL OF GRANTHAM
Ah, here we are.

LADY MARY
Why did you try to bribe Anna?

SIR RICHARD CARLISLE
She told you, did she?

LADY MARY
She didn’t. Not me. But why did you do it?

[Matthew stops by the fireplace and Lavinia asks him if he wants help getting up with a look. Matthew holds out a hand. He’ll do it himself.]

LADY MARY
Next time if you want to know anything, just ask me.

[Matthew stands up.]

ROBERT, EARL OF GRANTHAM
Well done.

[They applaud.]

SIR RICHARD CARLISLE
All right, then. I will. Once and for all, are you still in love with Matthew Crawley?

LADY MARY
Of course not. Would I ever admit to loving a man who preferred someone else over me?

[Mary walks away and sits down next to Violet.]

VIOLET, DOWAGER COUNTESS OF GRANTHAM
...find it rather a chore these days.

LADY MARY
Where’s Sybil?


LADY EDITH
She’s not feeling well. She told Anna she wouldn’t be down for dinner.

--
[41:53, INT. SERVANTS' HALL - EVENING]

ANNA
What is it?

MR BATES
I heard from my lawyer today. Apparently Vera wrote to a friend just before my last visit.

ANNA
Why are they telling you now?

MR BATES
It was only delivered a few days ago.

ANNA
Do you know what the letter says?

MR BATES
They send me a copy.

[Bates pulls it out of his jacket pocket and hands it to Anna. She opens it.]

ANNA
"John has written he's coming here tonight. His words sound as angry as I've ever heard him, and you know how angry that is. I never thought I'd say this, but I'm afraid for my life." But what did you write to her?

[Bates waits for a servant to pass by.]

MR BATES
I said I was coming that evening, that I meant to have it out with her. Now, I may have said she was being unreasonable, but so she was.

ANNA
Will it change anything?

MR BATES
Well, think about it. Before Vera's death, she had taken all my money and she had wrecked the divorce. Now as her widower, I inherit everything and we can marry whenever we like.

[Mrs Hughes descends the stairs.]

MRS HUGHES
Anna, they're going in.

[Anna gives Bates the letter and heads upstairs.]

MRS HUGHES
You look as if you got the cares of the world on your shoulders.

MR BATES
Not the whole world, Mrs Hughes, but quite enough of it.

--
[43:17, INT. LADY SYBIL'S BEDROOM CORRIDOR, NIGHT]
[Mary knocks on Sybil's door.]

LADY MARY
Sybil?

[Mary tries the door knob, but it's locked.]

LADY MARY
Sybil, I just want to say goodnight.

[Mary knocks again with no response, then hurries off with a furrowed brow.]

--
[43:34, INT. MRS HUGHES'S SITTING ROOM - NIGHT]

ANNA
Mrs Hughes, can I borrow the duplicate keys for upstairs?

MRS HUGHES
Why?

ANNA
Lady Mary says one of the bathroom keys isn't working. She thinks it must've got swapped.

[Mrs Hughes shakes her head with a sigh.]

MRS HUGHES
I'll come.

ANNA
Oh, no, there's no need. I'll bring it back in a jiffy. You've done enough for one day.

--
[43:54, INT. LADY SYBIL'S BEDROOM - NIGHT]
[Anna opens the room for Mary and they find it empty. Mary finds a note on the mantelpiece "To my family" and opens it.]

LADY MARY
Oh, my God, she's eloped. She's on her way to Gretna Green.

--
[44:21, EXT/INT. MOTORCAR - NIGHT]
[Edith drives with Mary and Anna in pursuit of Sybil and Branson.]

LADY MARY
They must stop at some point. It won't be open before the morning.

LADY EDITH
She won't expect us to be in pursuit until tomorrow, so they'll stay somewhere on the road.

ANNA
We hope.

LADY EDITH
Everyone keep an eye out for the motor.

LADY MARY
ANNA

--
[44:42, INT. KITCHENS - NIGHT]
[Daisy turns the lights on and opens the cupboard with the wedding cake with a smile.]

MRS PATMORE
Daisy, what in God's name are you doing down here at this hour?

DAISY MASON
I just wanted to check it were all right. That it hadn't, you know, caved in or anything.

MRS PATMORE
Caved in? It's a cake, not a soufflé.

DAISY MASON
I know, but I've never made a wedding cake before.

MRS PATMORE
Is that the one for tasting?

DAISY MASON
Yes, Mrs Patmore.

MRS PATMORE
Bring it out, we'll give it a try.

[Daisy takes the slice off the shelf and Mrs Patmore cuts off a sliver and they both try it. They gag.]

MRS PATMORE
What in God's name d'you call this?

DAISY MASON
I don't know. I did everything that you said, I promise.

MRS PATMORE
But didn't you taste the mixture?

[Daisy shakes her head.]

MRS PATMORE (sigh)
Well, then I'm afraid it's time to look at Thomas's ingredients.

[Mrs Patmore tastes the flour and spits it out.]

MRS PATMORE
Well, it's two-thirds plaster dust! Where's the [?]?

[Daisy fetches it from the shelf. Mrs Patmore tastes it and gags again.]

MRS PATMORE
This were old when Adam were a boy. (huff) So, Thomas was happy to let it go, was he? Well, he won't go anywhere near me in future. Chuck the whole bally lot out and we'll have to think again.

--
[46:07, EXT/INT. MOTORCAR - NIGHT]
[The girls continue their pursuit on the road. They pass an inn with a couple of motorcars out front.]

ANNA
Isn't that the car?

[Edith slams on the brakes.]

--
[46:20, INT. THE SWAN INN - NIGHT]
[Mary and Edith rush up the stairs. Mary knocks on the door and enters. Sybil and Branson pull off blankets as Branson gets up from the chair and Sybil gets up from the bed.]

BRANSON
How did you find us? How did you know?

LADY MARY
Never mind that. At least nothing’s happened, thank God.

LADY SYBIL
What do you mean “nothing’s happened”?

[Branson looks at Sybil, worried and confused about what she’s implying.]

LADY SYBIL
I’ve decided to marry Tom, and your coming after me won’t change that.

[Branson steps up beside Sybil confidently.]

LADY EDITH
This isn’t the way.

LADY MARY
She’s right. Of course Mama and Papa will hate it--

BRANSON
Why should they?

LADY MARY
Oh, pipe down. Sybil, can’t you let them get used to the idea? Take your stand and refuse to budge, but allow them time. That way you won’t have to break up the family.

LADY SYBIL
They would never give permission.

LADY MARY
You don’t need permission, you’re twenty-one. But you do need their forgiveness if you’re not to start your new life under a black shadow.

BRANSON
Don’t listen. She’s pretending to be reasonable to get you home again.

LADY MARY
Even if I am, even if I think this is mad, I know it would be better to do it in broad daylight than to sneak off like a thief in the night.

[Branson sighs, then looks at Sybil as he sees her resolve waning. She looks up at him and he knows Mary won.]

BRANSON
Go back with them, then. If you think they can make you happier than I will.

LADY SYBIL
Am I so weak you believe I could be talked out of giving my heart in five minutes flat? But Mary’s right. I don’t like deceit and our parents don’t deserve it. So, I’ll go back with them. Believe it or not, I will stay true to you.

[Sybil kisses his cheek. Edith gets Sybil’s luggage and Sybil takes one last teary-eyed look at Branson before leaving the room with Edith.]

BRANSON
I’ll return the car in the morning. You’re confident you can bring her 'round, aren’t you?

LADY MARY
Fairly. I’ll certainly try.

[Mary turns to leave, but pauses.]

LADY MARY
Do you want some money? For the room?

BRANSON
No thank you, my lady. I can pay my own way.

[Mary exits and Branson closes the door.]

[BREAK 4]

--
[48:36, INT. DINING ROOM - MORNING]

CORA, COUNTESS OF GRANTHAM
Where are the girls?

ROBERT, EARL OF GRANTHAM
I suppose Sybil's still ill and the others just haven't appeared.

CORA, COUNTESS OF GRANTHAM
I hope they're not coming down with anything. The stories of this Spanish flu are too awful.

ROBERT, EARL OF GRANTHAM
No, it's nothing of the sort. Why are you up so early?

CORA, COUNTESS OF GRANTHAM
I'm meeting Isobel. She wants me to help with her refugees.

ROBERT, EARL OF GRANTHAM
I thought the whole point of Mama arranging that was to keep her out of your hair.

CORA, COUNTESS OF GRANTHAM
I know. But now the soldiers are, I do have a lot of time on my hands, and maybe I can be useful.

ROBERT, EARL OF GRANTHAM
Why is it different from before the war?

CORA, COUNTESS OF GRANTHAM
Well, I don't know exactly, it just is. Maybe the war's changed me. I guess it's changed everybody.

ROBERT, EARL OF GRANTHAM
Not me.

CORA, COUNTESS OF GRANTHAM
Don't be too sure.

[Cora gives him a kiss on the cheek before she heads out.]

CORA, COUNTESS OF GRANTHAM
If I'm not back before luncheon, don't wait.

[Mr Carson removes a breakfast dish.]

MR CARSON
I'll take this down to keep it hot, my lord.

[Robert sits at the table by himself, depressed. Jane inches into the room.]

JANE
I wanted to catch you alone.

[Robert is startled by her presence.]

ROBERT, EARL OF GRANTHAM
Oh?

[Jane checks behind her and then approaches him at the table.]

JANE
Yes. You see, I think you might be happier if I tendered my resignation.

[Robert stands up.]

ROBERT, EARL OF GRANTHAM
What?

JANE
I'd hate you to be uncomfortable in your own house, and--

ROBERT, EARL OF GRANTHAM
I won't hear of it.

JANE
But I know--

ROBERT, EARL OF GRANTHAM
You won't be deprived of your livelihood because I behaved in an un-gentlemanly manner. The fault was entirely mine. You will not pay the price.

[They hear a noise from the servants' entrance and Jane runs out just as Carson appears around the screen. Robert picks up a letter and pretends to read it as he sits back down.]

--
[50:21, INT. THOMAS'S SHED - DAY]
[Thomas enters, takes off his hat, pulls out a knife and slashes open a few of the food packages. He proceeds to trash the shed, yelling. Eventually he slumps into a pile.]

--
[51:15, INT. CRAWLEY HOUSE - DAY]
[Isobel walks in with Mary’s good luck charm.]

ISOBEL CRAWLEY
Is this yours? Molesley found it in your dressing room. It’s not one of your old toys, is it? Because I don’t recognise it.

MATTHEW
No, it was given to me as a charm, I think, to take to the front.

ISOBEL CRAWLEY
Well, you’re home and safe now. Shall I put it in the barrel for the village children?

MATTHEW
No.

[Matthew grabs the toy dog from her and Isobel and Lavinia stare at him.]

MATTHEW
You never know. It might be bad luck not to keep it.

[Isobel smiles and Lavinia smiles back at her.]

ISOBEL CRAWLEY
Luncheon’ll be ready soon.

[Isobel exits and Matthew puts the dog in his pocket.]

--
[51:46, INT. THOMAS'S SHED - DAY]

THOMAS
It's all rubbish. It's all bloody rubbish.

O'BRIEN
Can't you ask for your money back?

THOMAS
Oh, yes. Of course I can ask, and a fat lot of good that'll do.

O'BRIEN
You must challenge him.

THOMAS
How? I only ever met him in a pub. I wouldn't know where to find him!

O'BRIEN
But, surely--

THOMAS
[?] woman! I've been tricked! Been had! Been taken for the fool I am.

[Thomas sits down for a smoke.]

O'BRIEN
How much did he get from you?

THOMAS
Every penny I had. And then some.

O'BRIEN
What are you going to do now?

THOMAS
I don't know. I don't bloody know.


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>>> SCRIPT LINE INDEX <<<


"You didn't know her when she was a child, Mrs Hughes. She was a guinea a [?] then."

I'm pretty sure the missing word is "minute".

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